Aug 21 - #iLearnPulaski Day 1

#iLearnPulaski Day 1 - Eclipse Day
Posted on 08/09/2017
a solar eclipse as seen from Indonesia in 2016.   Photo copyright Ridwan Arifiandi; Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 2.0 and may be accessed on the NASA website at https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2016/2016-solar-eclipse

Due to the eclipse, Pulaski County Schools will have an #iLearnPulaski Day on Monday, August 21st.  Students will not report to school on that day but will need to complete the assignments for #iLearnPulaski Day 1.  Teachers will be giving students their assignments and further instructions in the coming days.

PULASKI COUNTY WILL NOT EXPERIENCE TOTALITY.  Please use appropriate filters when viewing the eclipse through its entirety. 


From the NASA website https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety:
Looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totalityThe only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun; they transmit 
thousands of times too much sunlight.
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  • Always supervise children using solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the front of any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.
  • If you are within the path of totality (https://go.nasa.gov/2pC0lhe(link is external)), remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. As soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases. 
  • Outside the path of totality, you must always use a safe solar filter to view the sun directly.
  • If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them.

Viewing this series from upper right to lower left, this is a total solar eclipse as seen off the coast of Indonesia on March 9, 2016.This photo is credited to Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel and can be found at https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/images-videos.

Viewing this series from upper right to lower left, this is a total solar eclipse as seen off the coast of Indonesia on March 9, 2016.This photo is credited to Rick Fienberg / TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel and can be found at https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/images-videos.


The headline photo is of a solar eclipse as seen from Indonesia in 2016.   Photo copyright Ridwan Arifiandi; Creative Commons license CC BY-NC 2.0 and may be accessed on the NASA website at https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2016/2016-solar-eclipse


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